Glowing Stars for ceilings can help.

One in four 11 to 15-year-olds in England have too little sleep, a World Health Organization study suggests.

The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children reports questions 3,398 11, 13 and 15-year-olds every four years.

And 27% now say they are too tired to concentrate on their lessons – 17% of 11-year-olds, 28% of 13-year-olds and 42% of 15-year-olds.

The proportion of 15-year-olds who say they have low moods at least once a week has also risen, from 40% to 50%.

One in four 15-year-olds say they have self-harmed – and the proportion is rising faster among boys.

Girls, though, are more likely to have too little sleep, 32% compared with 23% of boys.

Just one in six of the youngsters (15%) say they are physically active for at least an hour a day.

But seven in 10 take part in “vigorous” physical activity at least two to three times a week, with boys (74%) more likely to do so than girls (63%).

girl eating breakfast

The study also suggests children are becoming less likely to take part in risky behavior:

  • just 3% say they have smoked at least three times in the past 30 days, while 7% have drunk alcohol
  • 21% of 15-year-olds have tried cannabis, while 20% have had sex, down from 41% in 2002

And when it comes to food:

  • 63% eat breakfast every day
  • 44% meet the government recommendations of eating five portions of fruit and vegetables every day
  • 39% usually eat a meal with their family every day, down from 51% in 2014

‘Worrying’

Research on adolescent health has highlighted how important the second decade of life is for health and well being, which is why this continued decline of emotional well being is really worrying.

“Although there are far less reported incidences of risk behaviors, young people are facing a multitude of different challenges that other generations have not really experienced, such as the prominence of smartphones and social media.

“These can have a negative impact on well being, particularly if they are exposed to cyber-bullying or if it affects their sleep.

“Increase in sleep difficulties, feeling low and self-harm are just some of the issues that need to be addressed.”

Opting for the night sky ceiling mural can really help gain a better night’s sleep.

This is not glow in the dark star stickers nor is it glow in the dark wallpaper ,this is a hand-painted night sky mural that replicates a real starry night sky using our special paint.

ADHD CHILDREN SLEEP LESS AND MORE POORLY

ADHD Children Sleep Less and More Poorly

Parents of ADHD children have claimed for years that their children have more trouble falling and staying asleep and have poorer quality sleep than other children.  A study out of Aarhus University has found that there is some truth behind this claim.

Recent studies have reported that approximately 70% of parents with ADHD children state that their child has a hard time falling and staying asleep and that their pre-bedtime routines take a long time.  Unfortunately, however, many science-based studies using electrodes to measure sleep quality have not been able to link ADHD and sleep quality.  This new Danish study gives some merit to these parental concerns and shows that children with ADHD do sleep worse than other children their age.

Behind the study is lead researcher, Anne Virring Sorensen, a medical doctor at the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Hospital in Risskov.  She reported that their study validates their experience, which is that their child with ADHD takes longer to get to bed and fall asleep.  With the measurements used in this study, researchers have seen also that these children have disruptive sleep, especially deep sleep.  Only looking at the length of sleep will tell you that children with ADHD sleep an average of 45 minutes less than other children; however, it is the quality of sleep that is most concerning, researchers state.

It is reported that two out of three children diagnosed with ADHD have at least one additional psychiatric condition, which in all likelihood increases the risks of poor sleep quality.  However, even when scientists look only at those with an ADHD diagnosis, they find that there is still a big difference in the patterns compared to children in the control group without a diagnosis.

In this Danish study, researchers also reviewed the daytime sleep patterns, and the findings were surprising.

They found that children with ADHD were able to fall asleep more quickly during the day than at night.  This is so surprising because one of the primary characteristics of ADHD is hyperactivity; however, researchers note that this hyperactivity may be compensatory for the inability to sleep during the day.

Researchers were unable to find a correlation between poor sleep quality and ADHD in the past may be due to the different methods of measurement.  In this study, electrodes were attached to the children for polysomnography readings during an afternoon at the hospital.  However, they still slept in familiar home surroundings.  Previously, children were admitted to sleep centers in a hospital overnight to get a sleep study performed.

Anne Virring Sorensen makes it clear in her findings that the children in this study received no medication to help them fall asleep.  This is a major concern because many ADHD children are given medication at night to help them sleep.

However many hundreds of parents with ADHD children have opted for a starry night sky ceiling mural in the child’s bedroom which has helped many gain a more relaxing sleep and reduced bedtime drama.

CHILDHOOD SLEEP AND SCHOOL SUCCESS.

Childhood Sleep and School Success

New research out of the Australia’s Queensland University of Technology suggests that 1 in 3 children between newborn and five years of age have trouble sleeping, leading to behavioral and emotional problems in the school setting. It was found that children who can ease themselves back to sleep in their earliest years have more productivity and better attention in school.

This new research involved looking at almost 3000 children in the study, “Growing up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.” Dr. Kate Williams of QUT’s School of Early Childhood reviewed the sleeping patterns of the children who were born in 2004, up to the age of six or seven years. She notes that by five years of age, most children (70%) can self-regulate their sleep; however, the remaining 30% may have developmental problems due to sleep irregularity.

This study, published in the British Journal of Educational Psychology, is the largest sample size for the topic, during which time mothers reported any sleep problems, along with emotional or behavioral concerns between birth and five years of age; while preschool teachers and daycare workers reported any emotional and behavioral problems during the day.

The surprise in the study came to Dr. Williams when she saw that there were escalating behavioral concerns in school in those children who had poorer regulation of sleep, emotions, and attention throughout the day. The children who were associated with having escalated emotional and behavioral problems were also linked to more frequent emotional outbursts, attention deficits, and hyperactivity.

The research implies that if these sleep patterns are not under control by the age of five, then the child is at increased risk of poor adjustment and behavior in later school years. There is a great opportunity, Dr. Williams believes, to teach more about sleep hygiene in children, with greater than 85% of parents utilizing childcare and preschool.

This most recent study indicates that prevention is the key to better school performance in young children. Children must learn these self-regulation skills, so parents will need to cut back on some of their habits – such as lying down with children, allowing them into their bed in the middle of the night, etc.

This research was built off of another study out of QUT that looked at how mandatory daytime naps in childcare or preschool can contribute to poor sleep habits later in life and, therefore, contribute to problems in school. It is believed, however, that sleep problems can be fixed long before a child reaches the first grade, so long as parents, preschool teachers, and childcare workers are well informed and willing to make necessary changes, which ultimately will probably be difficult.

In conclusion, the addition of the night sky ceiling mural has helped hundreds of people gain a more relaxing deep sleep both young and old as there is no age limit on the splendor of a starry night sky bedroom ceiling mural.