CHILDHOOD SLEEP AND SCHOOL SUCCESS.

Childhood Sleep and School Success

New research out of the Australia’s Queensland University of Technology suggests that 1 in 3 children between newborn and five years of age have trouble sleeping, leading to behavioral and emotional problems in the school setting. It was found that children who can ease themselves back to sleep in their earliest years have more productivity and better attention in school.

This new research involved looking at almost 3000 children in the study, “Growing up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.” Dr. Kate Williams of QUT’s School of Early Childhood reviewed the sleeping patterns of the children who were born in 2004, up to the age of six or seven years. She notes that by five years of age, most children (70%) can self-regulate their sleep; however, the remaining 30% may have developmental problems due to sleep irregularity.

This study, published in the British Journal of Educational Psychology, is the largest sample size for the topic, during which time mothers reported any sleep problems, along with emotional or behavioral concerns between birth and five years of age; while preschool teachers and daycare workers reported any emotional and behavioral problems during the day.

The surprise in the study came to Dr. Williams when she saw that there were escalating behavioral concerns in school in those children who had poorer regulation of sleep, emotions, and attention throughout the day. The children who were associated with having escalated emotional and behavioral problems were also linked to more frequent emotional outbursts, attention deficits, and hyperactivity.

The research implies that if these sleep patterns are not under control by the age of five, then the child is at increased risk of poor adjustment and behavior in later school years. There is a great opportunity, Dr. Williams believes, to teach more about sleep hygiene in children, with greater than 85% of parents utilizing childcare and preschool.

This most recent study indicates that prevention is the key to better school performance in young children. Children must learn these self-regulation skills, so parents will need to cut back on some of their habits – such as lying down with children, allowing them into their bed in the middle of the night, etc.

This research was built off of another study out of QUT that looked at how mandatory daytime naps in childcare or preschool can contribute to poor sleep habits later in life and, therefore, contribute to problems in school. It is believed, however, that sleep problems can be fixed long before a child reaches the first grade, so long as parents, preschool teachers, and childcare workers are well informed and willing to make necessary changes, which ultimately will probably be difficult.

In conclusion, the addition of the night sky ceiling mural has helped hundreds of people gain a more relaxing deep sleep both young and old as there is no age limit on the splendor of a starry night sky bedroom ceiling mural.

Stargazer Ceilings – The Best Way to Sleep under the Stars Every Night.

Stargazer Ceilings – The Best Way to Sleep under the Stars Every Night.

Imagine going to bed under a canopy of stars – every night.

Imagine being able to do this from the comfort of your own bed. (No sleeping bags or tents needed!)

Imagine how calming, soothing and relaxing that is after a hectic day.

Imagine how exciting this is for children! They would actually look forward to going to bed! And they will remember their magical stars for the rest of their lives.

Well, you no longer have to imagine…….

You can now have an illusion of the night sky on your bedroom ceiling!

With a Stargazers night sky ceiling mural that has helped people gain a more relaxing deep sleep, with 100% wow factor this amazing concept is invisible in the day time, then comes to life in the dark at night time.

All that you need is a white bedroom ceiling this can be any surface even bumpy to enable us to design a mind-blowing 3d like stargazers ceiling mural.

Why you need relaxation and sleep.

During the night

How often have you found yourself lying in bed thinking: “If only I could relax, I’d be able to sleep”? Well, there has to be truth in that. A relaxed state, physically and mentally, is certainly a prerequisite for sleep, and we know that naturally relaxed people are usually better sleepers.

Relaxation at bedtime and in bed is crucial, but sleep is not something that can be forced because it is a process of “de-arousal” or “letting go”. Fortunately, learning to relax is a general skill and it is possible to learn to relax, even if you’re not very good at it just now. It can help in a number of circumstances to take a less anxious approach. Being able to relax is great preparation for sleep, but it’s also a great asset for the day–to–day life too.

First of all, you need to know what relaxation is. The human relaxation response involves both physiological and mental changes. Physiologically, relaxation is associated with deeper and slower breathing, a reduction in “muscle tone” (reduced tension) and a lowering of the heart rate. At the cognitive or mental level, relaxation involves detachment from the immediate external world, a focus on pleasant sensations or experiences, and a reduction of mental effort and anxiety.

Your first step in becoming more relaxed is to ask yourself whether you could benefit from improving your ability to relax – your natural “relaxation response”.

 

 

Learning to value relaxation

Do you think it’s important to relax? People who don’t value relaxation don’t spend time on it. They might say it’s important, but in their behavior, you would never know. Our lives can be full of shoulds, musts, and ought to, and we often don’t give ourselves permission to relax. We might even feel that we shouldn’t relax because there are “things that need to be done”. Does any of this sound familiar? If so, your challenge is learning a value system. We are not designed to be on the go 24 hours a day.

General ways to relax

Whereas people indeed relax in different ways, there are four essential types of relaxation response. There is the relaxation response that you get from active physical pursuits – “burning up” physical stress through activities such as exercise. Then there are active mental tasks such as playing chess to address mental stress. Then there is passive relaxation, which is more like “letting go”, for example physically by having a bath or mentally by listening to music. Of course, there is no hard and fast distinction between active and passive, or physical and mental, but good sleepers are better than poor sleepers at the passive approach to relaxation.

In conclusion to the above laying in bed under a clear starry night, sky ceiling mural has all the positiveness that has been proven to help relax and create a calming space enabling a deep relaxing sleep.

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Help with sleep.

If you’re having trouble sleeping, one of the first things to consider is your bedroom. To get a restful night’s sleep, you need the right setting, which means a clean, peaceful and welcoming room. Many of us are unknowingly sleeping in a bedroom that’s simply not fit for purpose, and that environment could be the key cause of a restless night.

Fortunately, it’s relatively easy to transform your bedroom into a space that encourages a peaceful night’s sleep. Here are our top tips:

  • When it’s time for bed, make your room completely dark. This can be achieved with a blackout blind or curtains, an additional window dressing, or even an eye mask.
  • Maintain an ambient temperature in your room. If you’re too hot or too cold, you won’t sleep soundly. We recommend a cool temperature of around 16-18° C (60-65° F).
  • A tidy room makes for a tidy mind… and a restful night’s sleep! De-clutter your bedroom and create a space that’s clean, neat and simple. Even just relocating the laundry basket, stacking up some books or blitzing your bedside table can make a real difference.
  • Say no to technology in the bedroom! That means avoiding televisions and computers. Having access to these will urge you to switch on when you can’t drift off, which in turn can lead to even more disturbed sleep.
  • LED displays are particularly troublesome when it comes to getting a good night’s sleep. When it’s time to snooze, switch off your mobile phone, tablet, and any alarm clocks with a digital display.
  • Avoid treating your bedroom like an extension of the rest of your house. That means you shouldn’t use it for work, watching TV, eating, and even talking on the phone.
  • Add special touches to space, which will help you feel more connected and peaceful. Family photographs, plants, flowers, and ornaments will help to create a room that’s pleasant and relaxing.
  • Avoid using certain colors when decorating. Remember those bright reds, yellows, and oranges are jarring, while browns and whites are boring and drab. Instead, choose soft, muted tones that will make you feel calm.
  • Certain smells can affect your mood, helping you to feel more calm and relaxed. Lavender and germanium are naturally calming, so invest in some essential oils to help you drift off. Remember, these should not be used in pregnancy or children’s rooms.
  • Take the time to really consider your bedroom. Realize that you have a duty of care to yourself, and should, therefore, create a sleeping area that’s as effective as possible. Boost your well-being by making your bedroom more sleep-friendly – you’re worth it!
  • Consider having your bedroom ceiling designed with a night sky ceiling mural, as this is invisible throughout the day it will not change your decor. This has been proven to help create a calming tranquil way to drift off to sleep.